I Stayed in Berlin All Summer
(Ich bin den Sommer über in Berlin geblieben)

Screening on Film
Directed by Angela Schanelec.
With Isabel Karajan, Tobias Lenel, Wolfgang Michael.
Germany, 1994, 35mm, color, 47 min.
German with English subtitles.

The last short Schanelec made before her debut feature, I Stayed in Berlin All Summer confirms her commitment to narrative filmmaking while brazenly flouting the conventions of film grammar. The opening, which introduces the two central couples, scrambles continuity to heady effect. Schanelec’s aesthetic strategies might be initially disorienting, but the storytelling remains perfectly coherent. The character configuration gradually crystallizes, while the startling editing and non-naturalistic performances grant us keen insight into the couples’ respective dissatisfaction and sense of estrangement. The issue of understanding—paradoxically both the primary preoccupation of Schanelec’s cinema and, for many viewers, the primary obstacle to its appreciation—is directly addressed in the conclusion. Nadine, an aspiring author not coincidentally played by Schanelec herself, says she wants readers to understand her writing, but in the way that music is understood, as a rush of memories, as an indescribable, yet unmistakable feeling. – Giovanni Marchini Camia

PRECEDED BY

  • Lovely Yellow Color (Schöne Gelbe Farbe)

    Directed by Angela Schanelec.
    Germany, 1991, 16mm, color, 5 min.
    German with English subtitles.
  • Far Away (Weit entfernt)

    Directed by Angela Schanelec.
    Germany, 1992, 16mm, black & white, 9 min.
  • Princip Text

    Directed by Angela Schanelec.
    Germany, 2014, DCP, color, 5 min.
    German with English subtitles.

Part of program

Read more

Find Without Seeking. The Films of Angela Schanelec

Current and upcoming programs

Read more

Cinema of Resistance

Read more

Amadeus

Read more

Weekend Matinee

Read more

Holiday Show

Read more

Silent Hitchcock

Read more

Eve's Bayou by Kasi Lemmons

Read more

The Films and Videos of Richard Serra

Read more

Amour Fou

Read more

Self-Destruction Cinema. The Films of Tetsuya Mariko